EarthBuster On The Job

EarthBuster On The Job Photos

24 hours later
Septic drain field job, 24 hours later. Bobcat T450 (tracks) was used.
Front view
Preparing for a septic drain field job. Field was installed down hill. Was failing at the end of the line. Biomass emerging from ground and encroaching into neighbor's yard.
Gravel blown to surface
This gravel (not our pea gravel) came up from the hole during the EarthBusting pressure.
Pea Gravel for Filling Probe Holes
We recommend taking a few bucks of pea gravel along to fill the probe holes--especially if there are curious kids in the home. It keeps them from dropping Dad's screwdriver down the hole!
Preparing for puddle relief
Persistent puddling in a gravel driveway. The EarthBuster drained this puddle in a demonstration of its effectiveness--even if it's not ideal for driveways because of continued compaction from vehicles.
005
This was the rig we used in our scientific field-testing week.
Heights 1
The probe sinks into most of this particularly soft drain field without use of the air hammer.
Water-filled probe hole.
This probe hole filed with fluids, showing this particular field to be highly saturated.
110 (1)
This shot was taken from our field trials / scientific testing. We were in an agricultural setting with severe hardpan issues and Earthbuster performed beautifully!
Probe holes 1 week later
This is about a week after an EarthBuster job on this particular property. We had filled the probe holes with pea gravel.
Emerging Biomass 24 hours later
After the job, the emerging biomass began to dry and to disappear immediately. By the next day, the difference was obvious already.
Probe hole 1 week later
Here's a probe hole one week after the EarthBuster service. The hole had been filed with pea gravel right after the job.
Hose 2
Up to 300 feet of hose can be used. This is particularly convenient for sites where there's not room for the tractor and the compressor.
On Trailer
Loading up after a 2-hour drain field remediation and a 2-hour remediation of a poorly-draining lot downhill from an overflowing spring--all on the same job site.
Fracturing gravel lot
Another shot from the terrible ponding in a poorly-graded gravel parking lot. EarthBuster got this lot drained in one afternoon!
Surface Vent Fracture
Underground pressure from the EarthBuster opened this vent fracture as it created many open channels underground.
Silt-Filled Probe Hole
Here's a probe hole, partially filled with silt as the fluids underground were able to flow again.
Preparing for puddle relief
Persistent puddling in a gravel driveway.
Heights 2
Some plumes of effluent escape from a saturated drain field, where they had been captured by a waterproof biomat. With the biomat fractured, the effluent can once again drain into the leach field.
EarthBuster Mounted with Compressor
This drain field wasn't the problem. The problem was a clogged filter at the septic tank, keeping effluent from making into the drain field at all.
hard Ground plume
In extremely hard soil, the fracturing radius is narrower. Here, dry dirt blows back through the probe hole. (In looser, wetter soils, the fracturing radius can be as much as 10 or 12 feet!)
Emerging Septic Biomass
Biomass had filled the drain field, making it impossible to drain normally. Was also breaking the ground surface at the end of the field.
Front view
Preparing for a septic drain field job. Field was installed down hill. Was failing at the end of the line. Biomass emerging from ground and encroaching into neighbor's yard.
24 hours later
Septic drain field job, 24 hours later. Bobcat T450 (tracks) was used.
Draining a persistent parking lot pond
This 60-foot puddle (4-10 inches deep) had remained for 4 days after it rained. Gravel lot used for employee parking. EarthBuster had it cleared up in a couple of hours in an experimental trial. Being in a parking lot, the compaction would come back, of course, but it was an impressive experiment!
Probe hole that also vented
This probe hole shows where venting happened right around the problem. (See the three cracks). The softer the ground, the farther away from the probe the venting cracks are likely to appear. (This was very hard ground!)
Loading After
Loading after the job.
Track loader tracks, Day 2
The track loader caused minimal disturbance to the lawn, which was left unmowed in anticipation of the job (to protect the surface as much as possible).
draining parking area (1)
On the rare occasion where the ground is extremely hard, the probe can get stuck--especially when a small tractor is being used. With a little wiggling and leverage, it comes out and life goes on!
Hard ground
This agricultural site has a severe hardpan from 6 inches down to about 42 inches down. The EarthBuster was able to break it up all the way through, facilitating quick water absorption that was 6 times faster than before treatment!.
Just after fracturing
Immediately after treatment with the EarthBuster. 2 hours later, all the remaining puddles were gone.
Gravel blown up to surface
Here are some pieces of gravel that washed up from a probe hole during an EarthBuster job. Depending on conditions, liquids from below may rise to the surface during the process.